Balancing the public face with the student face

Let’s say that the “Syllabus Checklist” here was part of a major assignment for the eportfolio and went through at least a couple of drafts, with the first version getting instructor feedback.

The eportfolio might thus include both the first draft and the final version. But it’s the final version that the student wants ultimately to have available for the non-course audiences.

A section on this assignment might thus contain three separate pages: the original version, the new version with commentary that the instructor needs to facilitate the final evaluation, and the new version with no commentary at all (for the non-course audiences).

Setting up all three pages as PDF’s allows them to open quickly in WordPress. But they can also be annotated and highlighted as PDF’s, as with this version.

For the final (non-course-audience) version of the eportfolio, the student would simply delete the links to the original and to the annotated version, leaving the clean version as the final/public product.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

In similar fashion, the eportfolio author might want to make a distinction between the instructor as the audience (the person who needs to conduct the evaluation at the end of the term) and a fictional or future audience (someone who wasn’t a part of the course but who might read the portfolio later or who might be a convenient fiction for the creation of some or all of the portfolio). So there needs to be some kind of labeling for the various files, with the ability to strip off those labels quickly. One might manage this through dating of the files or applying “sticky notes” electronically.

The “insert” function in Word allows one to insert a text box and then save the doc as a PDF for posting to the eportfolio.

An overview or explanation specifically for the instructor might serve to guide that person through the final assessment process and then get stripped out of the eportfolio by deleting the links as described above.

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